August 2, 2017

Revisiting Cradlegrave

Why you need to seek out possibly the most-overlooked horror story in the last decade of comics

Cradlegrave - the cover of the trade paperback edition

First appearing in the UK weekly anthology comic 2000AD, Cradlegrave is one of the most criminally-overlooked stories published in comics anytime in the last decade — not just within 2000AD, not just in the field of horror, but in the entire oeuvre of comics. Over the course of just 12 six-page episodes published from 29 April 2009 to 15 July 2009, writer John Smith and artist Edmund Bagwell crafted a tale that — at first — looks to be mashup of disastrous constituents. Instead, Cradlegrave ends up becoming something so fabulously chilling that it should be on the essential reading list for anyone who is even slightly interested in what the medium of comics is capable of once you leave the convoluted world of superhero stories behind.

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Cradlegrave John Smith Edmund Bagwell horror comics 2000AD
December 23, 2016

No Rest Fest 4: an Englishman in Detroit

No Rest Fest 4 flyer

This started out as me just trying to write a music review.

In January 2015, members of Detroit-based math-punk band The Armed gathered together the various bands that released music under their No Rest Until Ruin label to play a blowout show together. This was how the first No Rest Fest came about.

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The Armed Detroit No Rest Fest music
January 23, 2016

The Armed’s untitled record was the best album of 2015

The cover of The Armed’s untitled record

Before January is over and the internet really moves on the usual previews, ones-to-watch, and new-stuff-new-stuff-now-now-NOW thinkpieces that fill the gaps in content creator’s heads all day and all night, I wanted to take a moment to discuss what I consider to be the best music release of 2015. That record is The Armed’s untitled album.

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The Armed untitled music Detroit
December 29, 2015

The death of Lemmy and what it means for your #content strategy

Stop worrying about your clickthrough rate and show some damn respect.

On 28 December 2015, Ian Kilmister, aka Lemmy, died following a short battle with cancer. He was 70 years old. His achievements in the world of rock music, most notably with Motörhead, the band he formed and fronted for 40 years, are nearly without peer. The 24 hours between his death and me writing this have been filled with heartfelt, genuine tributes to both the man and his legacy from so many, many people that his status as a unique figure within rock music’s pantheon of icons is clear for all to see.

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music Lemmy #content ethics